Nutrition Therapy

Questions about Nutrition Therapy? Read our FAQs.

Does My Child Need Nutrition Therapy?

A Registered Dietician (RD) is certified by the Commission on Dietetic Registration, the credentialing agency for The American Dietetic Association. Passionate about nutrition and wellness, your Registered Dietician is an advocate of early and aggressive nutrition therapy.  RDs may look at how nutrition plays a role in your child’s development. They work to ensure that nutrition is an integral part of managing symptoms and promoting wellness for children.  The Registered Dietician works as part of the highly experienced multi-disciplinary team who works with children and families to treat feeding, growth, and malnutrition concerns and disorders.

Nutrition Therapy for Children from 0-3 Years Old

At TEIS, our focus is on early intervention for children from 0-3 years old.  With a practical approach to care, a Registered Dietician focuses on meeting the individual needs of children and families by putting them at the center of care. Your RD performs a comprehensive nutrition assessment, plans and implements a nutrition intervention program, and evaluates your child’s progress throughout his or her time in early intervention. Your Nutrition Therapist is there to support you as a parent too, so that you can better help your child participate in all the activities and routines of daily life.

 

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What Parents Are Saying

Don’t just take it from us. Let the families we’ve helped do the talking!

 

Kristen had great ideas for presenting familiar and new foods to increase interest in the foods. Kristen has modeled great skill sand ideas for working with my son. Kristen’s presence truly helped me to decrease my anxiety over my son’s feeding issues. My son was always so thrilled to see her.

Kristen is truly great at what she does. She helped with so many aspects of my son’s “sensitivities” from feeding issues to trying on new shoes! She needs no improvement! Kristen provided support to our family in many ways.

When Kristen started working with our son, he was in the 0% for weight. At his 3rd birthday he is slightly about 50%. I am delighted that my child has been able to reach the 50% for weight and be open to new foods so that he is more typical in his eating AND hope that in the near future he will be able to truly eat like a typical 3 year old without so much coaching!

Renee R.

Frequently Asked Questions about Nutrition Therapy for Children

 

Does my child need a vitamin?

Most children do not need any single vitamin supplement provided they are eating a balanced diet.  Your body absorbs the nutrients in foods better than any supplement.  However, if your child is regularly missing out on a food group and or is a very picky eater a regular multi-vitamin that is age appropriate may be all that is needed.

How much should my child eat at a meal?

While every child’s nutrient needs are very different it is difficult to say exactly or very specifically how much your child should be eating per meal.  A typical toddler may only need a ¼ c or a few tablespoons of any food group at one time.  It is important not to overwhelm children with mini-adult size meals.  2-3 food groups offered at a meal is plenty while letting your child guide how much they will eat is appropriate.

How do I transition to whole milk?

Most children can transition to whole milk at age one year.  Some kids can take right to milk without any problems.  Others may need to have milk mixed in with breast milk or formula at different ratios to get them used to the taste.  Either way they do not need more than 12-18 oz. of whole milk per day.

What foods should I feed my child first when transitioning to solids?

Most babies start with iron-fortified cereals.  Once your child is ready to start additional solids you can use either fruits or vegetables.  Which you start with does not matter.  If you start with fruits it does not mean that your child will only prefer sweet foods.  

What foods should I feed my child first when transitioning to solids?

Most babies start with iron-fortified cereals.  Once your child is ready to start additional solids you can use either fruits or vegetables.  Which you start with does not matter.  If you start with fruits it does not mean that your child will only prefer sweet foods.  

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